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Archive for June, 2014


Two years ago we installed garden beds for a customer in Northampton County, PA. She was kind enough to take pictures – not only just after planting her garden vegetables and herbs, but once again just this past month for a follow-up look at what became of her garden. We’re happy to see that everything looks lush and beautiful. Thanks, Mrs. R, for sending in the pictures and for your business.

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Give Mike a call to discuss raised garden bed design and installation today: 908 783 5733. For ideas, check out our other website – http://gardenbedsnj.com.

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2013-06-26 13.01.55The most important factors in maintaining a lawn are, 1. cutting frequency, 2. cutting height, and 3. sharpness of your lawnmower blades. If any of these is off, it will damage your lawn. Cutting too short is probably the number one mistake that do-it-yourselfers make on their own lawns. It is also the most frequent request we hear from our lawn care customers.

Cutting too short doesn’t allow the root system to grow. Short on top means short roots. Short roots means your lawn is weak, and will burn out after the first heat wave. Much like a tree, the taller your grass grows, the bigger the root system and the better able your grass is to support itself. In a drought, a lawn with longer roots will be able to extract moisture from lower points in the ground and survive longer.

Cutting too short makes it easier for weeds to gain a foothold in your lawn. A lawn that is allowed to grow a bit longer will develop what is known as a pre-emergent layer. When you cut grass too short, you break this layer, allowing weed seeds to germinate and take over your yard.

Cutting too short generates too many clippings, which in time will build a layer of harmful thatch into your lawn. The fallen clippings are slow to break down, basically becoming a layer of dead grass (thatch). The thatch will then become matted against the ground in your lawn, preventing the lawn from being able to breathe and absorb moisture. You will get thatch if you either cut too short or cut too infrequently. This is like throwing huge piles of clippings into your lawn.

The final reason – if you keep your lawn cropped high, the grass will thicken and fill into that space. It’s a lot like trimming a shrub. If you trim a shrub with enough regularity, instead of becoming taller, the shrub grows fuller – it is the plant growing within itself. As far as lawns, follow this method and yours will be thicker, which is exactly what you want.

How short is too short?

The ideal cutting height for any lawn in zone 6 is 3 ¾ to 4 inches. There is never a need to go any shorter. In fact: you never want to cut more than ¾ of the total length of the grass blade because it’s harmful to the grass itself as a plant. You basically only want to cut the top half of a blade of grass, ever.

My personal opinion: grass that’s a little bit taller feels softer under your feet. A lawn that’s scalped feels prickly and less like a carpet.

Need expert lawn care in Hunterdon County, NJ? Contact Mike at 4 Seasons Lawn Care for a quote today: call 908 783 5733 or email mikehyde@4seasonslawns.com

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